Jute Product
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Jute is a long, soft, shiny vegetable fiber that can be spun into coarse, strong threads. It is produced primarily from plants in the genus Corchorus, which was once classified with the family Tiliaceae, and more recently with Malvaceae. The primary source of the fiber is Corchorus olitorius, but it is considered inferior to Corchorus capsularis.
[1] "Jute" is the name of the plant or fiber that is used to make burlap, hessian or gunny cloth. The word 'jute' is probably coined from the word jhuta or jota,
[2] an Oriya word. Jute is one of the most affordable natural fibers and is second only to cotton in amount produced and variety of uses of vegetable fibers.
Jute fibers are composed primarily of the plant materials cellulose and lignin. It falls into the bast fiber category (fiber collected from bast, the phloem of the plant, sometimes called the "skin") along with kenaf, industrial hemp, flax (linen), ramie, etc. The industrial term for jute fiber is raw jute. The fibers are off-white to brown, and 1–4 metres (3–13 feet) long. Jute is also called the golden fiber for its color and high cash value.



Familiar uses of jute include the followings:

  1. Sacks
  2. Bags
  3. Bailing and bundle cloths
  4. Wrapping
  5. Bedding foundation
  6. Boot and shoe linings
  7. Tailors back packing
  8. Camp beds
  9. Tarpaulins
  10. Cables
  11. Filter cloths
  12. Fuse yarns
  13. Hand bags and all types of stiff bags
  14. Horse covers
  15. Aprons of all heavy types
  16. Iron, steel, tube and rod wrappings
  17. Canal linings
  18. Mail bags
  19. Motor linings
  20. Needle felts
  21. ETC
  22. Roofing felts
  23. Rope
  24. Covering fabrics
  25. Tyre wrapping
  26. Upholstery foundation
  27. Strings of all types
  28. etc






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07, Kabi Faruk Sarani, Nikunja-2, Khilkhet. Dhaha-1229. Bangladesh.
+88 01823019690 , +88 02 58956419.
info@sprinkle.com.bd

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